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Are you concerned that you might be at risk for diabetes?

If you're experiencing any of the symptoms listed below, it's a good idea to speak to your doctor about getting tested for pre-diabetes. Keep in mind that not everyone who has pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-blown diabetes, but it's important to be aware of the risks and take steps to protect your health.

In this article, we'll take a closer look at what pre-diabetes is, the causes and risk factors, and the symptoms you should be watchful for.

What Is Pre-Diabetes?

You might be surprised to learn that there are actually three different types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. And pre-diabetes is a condition that usually leads to type 2 diabetes. So, what exactly is pre-diabetes?

Well, when you have pre-diabetes, it means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. If you have pre-diabetes, it's important to take steps to prevent the progression to type 2 diabetes, because if you don't, you're at a much higher risk for heart disease, stroke, and other serious health problems.

There are a few different factors that can contribute to pre-diabetes, including being overweight or obese, having a family history of diabetes, being over the age of 45, and being physically inactive. If you have any of these risk factors, it's important to talk to your doctor about your options for prevention.

What Causes Pre-Diabetes?

The cause of pre-diabetes is still unknown, but there are a few risk factors that can increase your chances of developing the condition, such as:

- being overweight or obese.

- having a family history of diabetes.

- being over the age of 45.

- having high blood pressure.

- having high cholesterol.

- being physically inactive.

- having a history of gestational diabetes.

Who Is at Risk for Pre-Diabetes?

If you have any of the following risk factors, you may be at risk for pre-diabetes:

- A family history of diabetes.

- Being overweight or obese.

- Having high blood pressure.

- Having high cholesterol.

- Having a sedentary lifestyle.

- Being African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander.

- Having a history of gestational diabetes.

What Are the Symptoms of Pre-Diabetes?

You might be wondering what the symptoms of pre-diabetes are. After all, it's important to be able to identify the condition early, so you can take steps to reverse it.

The most common symptom of pre-diabetes is insulin resistance. This means that your body is not able to effectively use the hormone insulin to regulate your blood sugar levels. As a result, your blood sugar levels may be higher than normal.

Other symptoms include:

- Frequent urination.

- Excessive thirst.

- Fatigue.

- Blurred vision.

If you notice any of these symptoms, it's important to see a doctor, so you can get a blood test to check your blood sugar levels.

How Is Pre-Diabetes Diagnosed?

If your doctor suspects you have pre-diabetes, they will likely order a fasting plasma glucose test. This test measures your blood sugar after you have fasted for at least 8 hours. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have pre-diabetes.

Your doctor may also order an A1C test, which measures your average blood sugar over the past 2 or 3 months. If your A1C is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, you have pre-diabetes.

Other tests that may be ordered include the a2-hour oral glucose tolerance test, which measures your blood sugar before and 2 hours after you drink a sugary liquid; and a glycohemoglobin test, which measures the percentage of sugar bound to hemoglobin (red blood cells).

What Are the Complications of Pre-Diabetes?

If you have pre-diabetes, it's important to be aware of the potential complications. After all, pre-diabetes is a serious condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes, which can in turn lead to a host of other health problems.

Some of the complications of pre-diabetes include:

- Heart disease.

- Kidney disease.

- Stroke.

- Vision problems.

- Nerve damage.

- Foot problems.

If you have pre-diabetes, it's important to talk to your doctor about ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And, even if you don't have pre-diabetes, it's still a good idea to be aware of the symptoms and risk factors so that you can take steps to prevent the condition.

Conclusion.

If you're worried that you may have pre-diabetes, it's important to talk to your doctor. They can give you a blood test to check your blood sugar levels and advise you on how to manage your diabetes.

There are many different types of diabetes, and each type has its own set of symptoms. If you're concerned about any of the symptoms listed above, be sure to talk to your doctor. They can help you determine if you have diabetes and advise you on the best course of treatment.